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ONE WARM COAT DRIVE

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact Name: Diana Escobar

Daytime Phone Number: 925.255.6320

Contact email: PPM4rent@aol.com

 

Professional Property Management Seeks Coat Donations

 

Professional Property Management and One Warm Coat®,

spreading warmth…one coat at a time.

 

[El Sobrante, Calfornia, November 15, 2018 – Professional Property Management is hosting a coat drive to collect clean, gently worn, warm coats on November 15, 2018 thru January 31, 2019 between 9:00 AM and 5:00PM at 5054 El Portal Drive, Suite C, El Sobrante, CA . Area residents are invited to make a difference in our local community by donating to the coat drive and helping Professional Property Management reach their goal of collecting 500 coats and $1,000.00 dollars.

 

“We are so excited about our upcoming One Warm Coat drive and hope the community will support us.  There are nearly 50 million Americans currently living in poverty and struggling to provide a warm coat for themselves or their families.  One Warm Coat’s program helps us keep all of the coats we collect in this community, which will make a big difference for our neighbors who need a coat” said Coat Drive Ambassador and Professional Property Management’s Assistant Manager, Diana Escobar and Gene Smith, President.

 

Customers who do not have a coat to donate can still get involved:

  • Professional Property Management will be asking for donations for One Warm Coat during check-out at the register.
  • Text “WARM” to 80100 to donate $10 to One Warm Coat
  • Visit onewarmcoat.org/donate

 

Each year, hundreds of thousands of gently worn coats are distributed across North America to children, women and men in need through One Warm Coat’s Coat Drive program. “We are so grateful for our partners like Professional Property Management!  It is because of our incredible volunteers that we have been around for 26 years, helping get coats to our neighbors who need them. Thanks to Professional Property Management’s efforts, many people in this community will have a much warmer winter”, commented Jennifer Stockard, President and Chief Executive Officer of One Warm Coat.

 

One Warm Coat is a national non-profit organization that works to provide a free, warm coat to any person in need and raises awareness of the vital need for warm coats.  One Warm Coat supports individuals, groups, companies and organizations across the country by providing the tools and resources needed to hold a successful coat drive.  Coats are distributed in the communities where they were collected, to any person in need, without charge, discrimination or obligation. Over the past 26 years, One Warm Coat has worked with its volunteers to give away nearly 5 million coats.

 

Professional Property Management is a full service Real Estate Brokerage specializing in Residential and Commercial Real Estate Leasing, Management and Sale throughout the East Bay Area. Professional Property Management is located at 5054 El Portal Drive, Suite C, El Sobrante, CA 94803 510-758-5636  DRE 01902148 PPM4rent@aol.com

 

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California median home price sets new record as home sales dial back, C.A.R. reports

June 19, 2018


California median home price sets new record as home sales dial back, C.A.R. reports

– Existing, single-family home sales totaled 409,270 in May on a seasonally adjusted annualized rate, down 1.8 percent from April and down 4.6 percent from May 2017.

– May’s statewide median home price was $600,860, up 2.8 percent from April and 9.2 percent from May 2017, hitting a new high for the first time in more than 10 years.

– Homebuyers in San Francisco County paid an average of 18 percent higher than asking price, as the average price per square foot in the county reached more than $1,000.

LOS ANGELES (June 19) – California’s median home price reached a new high in May, while home sales retreated both on a monthly and annual basis, wiping out most of the gains posted for the year, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.) said today.

Closed escrow sales of existing, single-family detached homes in California totaled a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 409,270 units in May, according to information collected by C.A.R. from more than 90 local REALTOR® associations and MLSs statewide. The statewide annualized sales figure represents what would be the total number of homes sold during 2018 if sales maintained the May pace throughout the year. It is adjusted to account for seasonal factors that typically influence home sales.

May’s sales figure was down 1.8 percent from the revised 416,750 level in April and down 4.6 percent compared with home sales in May 2017 of 428,870. May marked the first year-over-year sales decline in four months and the lowest sales level in more than a year.

“The softening in May home sales was due in part to the spike in interest rates in mid-April, when the 30-year fixed mortgage rate jumped 20 basis points in just one week to reach the highest level since 2014,” said C.A.R. President Steve White. “Homebuyers may have postponed escrow closings to wait out the effects of the rate surge. Additionally, the specter of rate increases earlier in the year may have pulled sales forward into the first quarter, which resulted in the subpar performance in the last couple of months. Looking ahead, higher mortgage rates and elevated home prices will heighten affordability constraints that will likely temper the housing market in the coming months.”

For the first time in 11 years, the statewide median home price surpassed its previous peak price of $594,530, which was recorded more than 10 years ago during the last housing boom. The May statewide median price was $600,860, up 2.8 percent from a revised $584,460 in April and up 9.2 percent from a revised $550,230 in May 2017. The year-over-year price growth pace was the highest rate of growth since May 2014.

The statewide median price per square foot rose to $286 in May, the highest figure since November 2007, and marks “real” growth in home values rather than a shift in the market toward sales of larger or higher-end homes. However, with the Bay Area outperforming the rest of the state, there is undoubtedly some pressure on the median price as the Bay Area made up a larger share of home sales.

“As we predicted last month, California’s statewide median home price broke the previous pre-recession peak set in May 2007 and hit another high as tight supply conditions continued to pour fuel on the price appreciation fire,” said C.A.R. Senior Vice President and Chief Economist Leslie Appleton-Young. “With inventory starting to show signs of improvement, however, home price appreciation could decelerate in the second half of the year, especially since further  rate increases are expected to hamper homebuyers’ affordability and limit how much they are willing to pay for their new home.”

Other key points from C.A.R.’s May 2018 resale housing report include:

  • On a regionwide, non-seasonally adjusted basis, only the San Francisco Bay Region recorded both solid month-to-month and year-over-year sales gains. Sales in the Bay Area rose 17.3 percent monthly and 2.1 percent annually. Sales in the Inland Empire increased 7.6 percent from April and was down 5.0 percent from a year ago. The Los Angeles metro region experienced a 12.6 percent monthly sales jump but was down 5.6 percent annually.
  • The Bay Area Region, which has recorded annual sales increases for the past four months, continued to lead the state in home sales. Five of nine Bay Area counties posted year-over-year sales gains – with San Francisco increasing by double-digits – while Napa, Sonoma, Santa Clara, and Solano counties experienced annual sales declines.
  • The Central Valley Region maintained its momentum for the fifth consecutive month as regionwide sales experienced a slight 0.9 percent improvement and nine of 12 counties in the region performed better than the previous year. Three counties – including Glenn, Kern, and San Benito – posted double-digit increases, but their gains were mostly offset by the losses of San Joaquin, Placer, and Stanislaus.
  • The Southern California Region continued to lag the state. Overall sales in the region declined by 5.8 percent compared to a year ago, and sales in five of the six counties dropped on a year-over-year basis. Sales in Riverside County declined the most, followed by Orange County, and San Diego. Only San Bernardino County recorded an annual sales gain.
  • The bottom end of the market continued to bear the brunt of the housing shortage as the availability of homes priced under $200,000 declined by 28.7 percent on an annual basis, and those priced between $200,000 and $299,999 dropped 13.1 percent. On the other hand, inventory of properties priced $1 million and above increased by more than 18 percent. In general, supply constraints continue to limit sales in market segments priced below $500,000, but higher-priced properties continue to show modest to strong growth in sales in the recent month.
  • Home prices in the Bay Area remained robust in May, with the region’s median price spiking 16.4 percent from $935,000 in May 2017 to $1,088,000. In fact, the median price for the region remained above the $1 million benchmark for the second straight month and set a new record high. Five of the nine counties in the region had a median price above $1 million in May 2018, with Alameda becoming the latest member to join the million-dollar club ($1,025,000). Other million-dollar club members include San Francisco ($1,620,000), San Mateo ($1,600,000), Marin ($1,415,000) and Santa Clara ($1,400,000). Home prices increased in all nine counties on a year-over-year basis, and prices in three counties climbed by more than 10 percent.
  • Home prices in Southern California were more tepid by comparison, but still showed a steady upward trend. Prices in San Bernardino and Los Angeles increased the most with near double-digit growth rates, while prices throughout the rest of the region grew at a more modest rate ranging between 4.6 percent and 5.8 percent.
  • The number of statewide active listings improved for the second consecutive month, increasing 8.3 percent from the previous year. The year-over-year increase was the largest since January 2015, when active listings jumped 11.0 percent. Perhaps more homeowners are listing their homes for sale in an effort to cash out on recent home price surges. The increase in active listings was also partly due to the sales decline, which led to a boost in inventory.
  • As sales declined from a year ago, the unsold inventory index, which is a ratio of inventory over sales, increased on a year-over-year basis as well. The statewide unsold inventory index edged up to 3.0 months in May from 2.9 months in May 2017. The index measures the number of months it would take to sell the supply of homes on the market at the current sales rate.
  • The median number of days it took to sell a California single-family home remained low at 15 days in May compared with 14 days in May 2017.
  • C.A.R.’s statewide sales price-to-list price ratio* was 100 percent in May, unchanged from May 2017.
  • The average statewide price per square foot** for an existing, single-family home statewide was $286 in May, up from $268 in May 2017.
  • Mortgage rates have been on the rise since breaking the 4.0 percent barrier in January. The 30-year, fixed-mortgage interest rates averaged 4.59 percent in May, up from 4.47 percent in April and from 4.01 percent in May 2017, according to Freddie Mac. The five-year, adjustable mortgage interest rate also perked higher in May to an average of 3.79 percent from 3.66 percent in April and from 3.12 percent in May 2017.

Graphics (click links to open):

Note:  The County MLS median price and sales data in the tables are generated from a survey of more than 90 associations of REALTORS® throughout the state and represent statistics of existing single-family detached homes only. County sales data are not adjusted to account for seasonal factors that can influence home sales.  Movements in sales prices should not be interpreted as changes in the cost of a standard home.  The median price is where half sold for more and half sold for less; medians are more typical than average prices, which are skewed by a relatively small share of transactions at either the lower-end or the upper-end. Median prices can be influenced by changes in cost, as well as changes in the characteristics and the size of homes sold.  The change in median prices should not be construed as actual price changes in specific homes.

*Sales-to-list price ratio is an indicator that reflects the negotiation power of home buyers and home sellers under current market conditions. The ratio is calculated by dividing the final sales price of a property by its last list price and is expressed as a percentage.  A sales-to-list ratio with 100 percent or above suggests that the property sold for more than the list price, and a ratio below 100 percent indicates that the price sold below the asking price.

**Price per square foot is a measure commonly used by real estate agents and brokers to determine how much a square foot of space a buyer will pay for a property.  It is calculated as the sale price of the home divided by the number of finished square feet.  C.A.R. currently tracks price-per-square foot statistics for 50 counties.

Leading the way…® in California real estate for more than 110 years, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (www.car.org) is one of the largest state trade organizations in the United States with more than 190,000 members dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. C.A.R. is headquartered in Los Angeles.

# # #

May 2018 County Sales and Price Activity
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

May 2018 Median Sold Price of Existing Single-Family Homes Sales
State/Region/County May 2018 April 2018   May 2017   Price MTM% Chg Price YTY% Chg Sales MTM% Chg Sales YTY% Chg
Calif. Single-family home $600,860 $584,460   $550,230 r 2.8% 9.2% -1.8% -4.6%
Calif. Condo/Townhomes $474,400 $476,010   $440,940 r -0.3% 7.6% 8.5% -2.0%
Los Angeles Metro Area $530,000 $515,000   $485,000 r 2.9% 9.3% 12.6% -5.6%
Inland Empire $360,000 $360,000   $340,000 r 0.0% 5.9% 7.6% -5.0%
San Francisco Bay Area $1,088,000 $1,025,890 r $935,000 r 6.1% 16.4% 17.3% 2.1%
                   
San Francisco Bay Area                  
Alameda $1,025,000 $969,300   $862,000   5.7% 18.9% 15.5% 6.7%
Contra Costa $687,500 $689,660   $653,000   -0.3% 5.3% 18.9% 5.1%
Marin $1,415,000 $1,385,000   $1,315,000   2.2% 7.6% 15.5% 3.5%
Napa $702,500 $682,500   $673,250   2.9% 4.3% 10.6% -14.8%
San Francisco $1,620,000 $1,650,000   $1,501,680   -1.8% 7.9% 26.9% 10.8%
San Mateo $1,600,000 $1,770,000   $1,480,000   -9.6% 8.1% 31.0% 2.5%
Santa Clara $1,400,000 $1,425,000   $1,200,000   -1.8% 16.7% 14.2% -1.7%
Solano $451,000 $447,500   $415,000   0.8% 8.7% 15.1% -0.7%
Sonoma $698,500 $685,000   $625,000   2.0% 11.8% 13.0% -3.2%
Southern California                  
Los Angeles $536,940 $528,540   $492,040   1.6% 9.1% 17.6% -5.5%
Orange $838,000 $818,000   $795,000   2.4% 5.4% 12.4% -7.4%
Riverside $409,925 $400,000   $375,000   2.5% 9.3% 6.5% -8.7%
San Bernardino $285,000 $289,900   $272,500   -1.7% 4.6% 9.5% 2.1%
San Diego $640,000 $635,000   $605,000   0.8% 5.8% 10.2% -6.1%
Ventura $670,000 $665,000 r $636,500 r 0.8% 5.3% 13.3% -5.9%
Central Coast                  
Monterey $677,000 $607,750   $617,000   11.4% 9.7% 15.3% 16.7%
San Luis Obispo $638,660 $597,505   $569,000   6.9% 12.2% 23.4% 0.3%
Santa Barbara $680,000 $650,000   $725,000   4.6% -6.2% 8.4% -10.0%
Santa Cruz $865,000 $899,000   $875,000   -3.8% -1.1% 8.4% 34.1%
Central Valley                  
Fresno $279,980 $260,000 r $250,000   7.7% 12.0% 12.0% 0.9%
Glenn $230,000 $215,000   $200,000   7.0% 15.0% 138.5% 40.9%
Kern $247,750 $235,000   $230,000   5.4% 7.7% 33.0% 20.9%
Kings $235,000 $235,000   $211,000   0.0% 11.4% 3.0% 8.3%
Madera $259,000 $244,000 r $249,000 r 6.1% 4.0% 22.9% 3.5%
Merced $262,000 $259,000   $243,500   1.2% 7.6% 30.6% 2.1%
Placer $499,650 $489,000   $460,000   2.2% 8.6% 11.4% -6.5%
Sacramento $375,000 $369,000   $342,100   1.6% 9.6% 9.4% 2.4%
San Benito $579,900 $569,217   $520,000   1.9% 11.5% 10.2% 38.3%
San Joaquin $367,855 $374,990   $331,950   -1.9% 10.8% 21.1% -6.9%
Stanislaus $325,000 $306,000   $290,000   6.2% 12.1% 12.9% -5.8%
Tulare $234,950 $229,250   $225,000   2.5% 4.4% 18.2% 6.4%
Other Calif. Counties                  
Amador $331,500 $335,000   $350,000   -1.0% -5.3% 6.8% -20.3%
Butte $324,100 $316,000   $308,000   2.6% 5.2% 1.2% -7.3%
Calaveras $329,000 $340,000   $300,000 r -3.2% 9.7% 34.0% 17.1%
Del Norte $214,000 $239,000   $220,000   -10.5% -2.7% -17.4% 18.8%
El Dorado $552,000 $499,999   $469,000   10.4% 17.7% 0.7% -0.7%
Humboldt $314,900 $309,000   $289,500   1.9% 8.8% -2.6% 10.8%
Lake $263,400 $285,000   $240,000   -7.6% 9.7% 3.8% -15.6%
Lassen $215,000 $155,500   $192,500   38.3% 11.7% 93.3% 93.3%
Mariposa $324,500 $344,850   $271,000   -5.9% 19.7% 7.7% -26.3%
Mendocino $420,000 $430,000   $410,000   -2.3% 2.4% 62.9% -1.7%
Mono $852,500 $520,000   $627,500   63.9% 35.9% 42.9% -16.7%
Nevada $404,000 $408,738   $389,000   -1.2% 3.9% 10.0% -20.4%
Plumas $310,000 $280,250   $285,000   10.6% 8.8% 225.0% 14.7%
Shasta $264,000 $258,950   $255,000   2.0% 3.5% 2.7% 3.4%
Siskiyou $210,000 $217,250   $211,500   -3.3% -0.7% 47.1% -7.4%
Sutter $281,000 $280,000   $283,000   0.4% -0.7% 22.7% 5.7%
Tehama $197,500 $210,000   $203,000   -6.0% -2.7% -14.6% -32.7%
Tuolumne $300,000 $305,000   $299,000   -1.6% 0.3% -14.1% -5.2%
Yolo $476,500 $495,000   $453,450   -3.7% 5.1% 13.2% -5.3%
Yuba $297,500 $285,000   $255,570   4.4% 16.4% 7.6% -4.5%

r = revised

 

 

 

May 2018 County Unsold Inventory and Time on Market
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

May 2018 Unsold Inventory Index Median Time on Market
State/Region/County May 2018 April 2018   May 2017   May 2018 April 2018   May 2017  
Calif. Single-family home 3.0 3.2   2.9   15.0 15.0   14.0 r
Calif. Condo/Townhomes 2.3 2.4   2.3 r 13.0 12.0   13.0 r
Los Angeles Metro Area 3.4 3.6   3.2   20.0 21.0   20.0 r
Inland Empire 3.6 3.7   3.3 r 27.0 29.0   25.0 r
San Francisco Bay Area 2.0 2.1   2.1   12.0 11.0 r 12.0 r
                     
San Francisco Bay Area                    
Alameda 1.6 1.7   1.7   11.0 10.0   12.0 r
Contra Costa 2.0 2.1   2.1   11.0 11.0   11.0 r
Marin 2.5 2.7   2.6   21.0 22.0   27.0 r
Napa 4.5 4.3   3.8   33.5 37.5   38.0 r
San Francisco 1.5 1.9   1.9   14.0 14.0   14.0 r
San Mateo 1.6 1.9   1.7   11.0 10.0   11.0 r
Santa Clara 1.6 1.6   1.7   8.0 8.0   9.0 r
Solano 2.5 2.6   2.3   27.0 29.0   31.0 r
Sonoma 3.1 3.0   3.0   31.0 33.0   33.0 r
Southern California                    
Los Angeles 3.1 3.2   3.0   15.0 17.0   16.0 r
Orange 3.3 3.5   3.1   15.0 14.0   15.0 r
Riverside 3.4 3.6   3.2   27.0 29.0   26.0 r
San Bernardino 3.8 3.9   3.3 r 26.0 28.0   24.0 r
San Diego 2.9 3.0   2.6   13.0 11.0   11.0 r
Ventura 5.2 5.5   5.0   42.0 39.0   42.0 r
Central Coast                    
Monterey 3.3 3.8   4.2   16.0 22.0   16.0 r
San Luis Obispo 3.7 4.3   3.6   20.0 19.5   15.0 r
Santa Barbara 4.6 4.5   4.0   17.0 20.5   19.0 r
Santa Cruz 2.8 2.7   4.0   12.0 11.0   14.0 r
Central Valley                    
Fresno 2.7 2.8 r 2.7 r 11.0 12.0 r 14.0 r
Glenn 2.7 6.1   3.7   21.0 16.0   40.5 r
Kern 2.8 3.5   3.3   21.0 19.0   19.0 r
Kings 2.9 2.9   3.0   13.5 16.0   15.5 r
Madera 3.8 4.9 r 5.4 r 24.0 19.0 r 28.0 r
Merced 3.0 4.1   2.7   23.0 28.0   15.0 r
Placer 2.5 2.5   2.2 r 10.0 10.0   10.0 r
Sacramento 2.2 2.2   2.0   9.0 10.0   8.0 r
San Benito 2.2 2.5   3.7   15.0 13.0   16.0 r
San Joaquin 2.6 2.8   2.3   12.0 12.0   12.0 r
Stanislaus 2.6 2.7   2.4   12.0 13.0   12.0 r
Tulare 3.2 3.8   3.5   26.0 23.0   23.0 r
Other Calif. Counties                    
Amador 5.2 5.3   3.8   31.0 16.0   27.0 r
Butte 3.4 3.2   2.9   11.0 9.0   8.0 r
Calaveras 4.6 5.7   4.8   30.0 28.0   24.0 r
Del Norte 7.3 5.3   9.4   99.0 145.0   73.0 r
El Dorado 4.1 3.5 r 4.2   25.0 20.0   16.0 r
Humboldt 5.9 5.0   5.0   22.0 22.0   11.0 r
Lake 6.1 6.0   4.6   35.0 39.5   36.0 r
Lassen 6.1 10.5   10.9   97.0 137.0   61.0 r
Mariposa 6.7 6.9   4.2   45.0 15.0   18.0 r
Mendocino 8.4 12.7   5.8   74.0 70.0   69.0 r
Mono 8.3 10.6   8.4   81.5 170.0   144.0 r
Nevada 4.9 4.7   3.2   16.0 22.5   13.0 r
Plumas 8.4 22.0   10.4   129.0 178.5   207.0 r
Shasta 4.4 4.4   4.3   17.0 22.0   20.0 r
Siskiyou 6.0 7.8   5.1   16.0 25.0   29.0 r
Sutter 2.2 2.9   2.4   11.0 32.0   14.0 r
Tehama 6.0 5.0   4.3   43.0 55.0   41.0 r
Tuolumne 5.2 3.8   5.0   24.0 23.0   39.0 r
Yolo 2.0 2.1   2.2   9.0 10.0   9.0 r
Yuba 2.8 3.0   2.3   10.0 17.0   11.0 r

r = revised

SALES AND PRICE ACTIVITY REGIONAL

SALES AND PRICE ACTIVITY (SFH Homes)
Regional/ Sales Data and Condo Sales Data Not Seasonally Adjusted
February-18 Median Sold Price of Existing Single-Family Homes Sales
State/Region/County Feb-18 Jan-18 Feb-17 Price MTM% Chg Price YTY% Chg  Sales MTM% Chg  Sales YTY% Chg
CA SFH (SAAR) $522,440 $527,780 R $480,270 R -1.0% 8.8% 3.3% 5.4%
CA Condo/Townhomes $461,400 $433,160 R $407,100 R 6.5% 13.3% 5.5% -2.4%
Los Angeles Metropolitan Area $497,730 $492,450 $454,520 R 1.1% 9.5% -7.3% -2.5%
Inland Empire $352,570 $349,710 $327,440 R 0.8% 7.7% -3.6% -1.2%
S.F. Bay Area $893,690 $809,900 $784,470 10.3% 13.9% 7.5% 7.1%
S.F. Bay Area Feb-18 Jan-18 Feb-17 Price MTM% Chg Price YTY% Chg  Sales MTM% Chg  Sales YTY% Chg
Alameda $832,000 $840,000 $786,000 -1.0% 5.9% 5.4% 6.8%
Contra Costa $610,000 $555,000 $554,250 9.9% 10.1% 0.7% 11.2%
Marin $1,371,000 $1,317,500 $1,174,500 4.1% 16.7% 1.2% 1.2%
Napa $713,500 $662,000 $660,000 7.8% 8.1% -7.9% 18.6%
San Francisco $1,730,000 $1,330,000 $1,276,000 30.1% 35.6% 8.6% -4.7%
San Mateo $1,610,000 $1,437,500 $1,352,000 12.0% 19.1% 30.2% 16.1%
Santa Clara $1,383,500 $1,170,000 $1,100,000 18.2% 25.8% 19.3% 5.7%
Solano $430,000 $425,000 $382,500 1.2% 12.4% 8.0% 3.1%
Sonoma $689,000 $670,000 $598,640 2.8% 15.1% -5.5% 3.9%
Southern California Feb-18 Jan-18 Feb-17 Price MTM% Chg Price YTY% Chg  Sales MTM% Chg  Sales YTY% Chg
Los Angeles $527,280 $564,100 $470,200 R -6.5% 12.1% -6.0% -3.9%
Orange $805,380 $780,000 $745,000 3.3% 8.1% 5.0% -1.0%
Riverside $396,250 $397,250 $367,250 -0.3% 7.9% 1.7% -0.8%
San Bernardino $278,000 $277,000 $265,000 R 0.4% 4.9% -11.2% -2.0%
San Diego $605,000 $590,000 $559,950 2.5% 8.0% 4.7% -3.9%
Ventura $609,000 $660,720 $582,500 R -7.8% 4.5% -17.7% -7.1%
Central Coast Feb-18 Jan-18 Feb-17 Price MTM% Chg Price YTY% Chg  Sales MTM% Chg  Sales YTY% Chg
Monterey $590,000 $571,500 $535,000 3.2% 10.3% -8.2% 7.7%
San Luis Obispo $605,000 $565,000 $556,000 7.1% 8.8% -21.9% -4.3%
Santa Barbara $755,000 $567,000 $844,000 33.2% -10.5% 1.3% 16.7%
Santa Cruz $800,000 $790,000 $799,000 1.3% 0.1% -23.5% -9.3%
Central Valley Feb-18 Jan-18 Feb-17 Price MTM% Chg Price YTY% Chg  Sales MTM% Chg  Sales YTY% Chg
Fresno $265,000 $245,450 R $230,000 R 8.0% 15.2% 4.0% 5.7%
Glenn $219,600 $228,500 $181,500 -3.9% 21.0% -31.3% -8.3%
Kern $237,000 $225,500 $218,000 5.1% 8.7% 3.4% 4.2%
Kings $215,000 $238,000 $222,500 -9.7% -3.4% -11.1% -17.9%
Madera $255,000 $275,000 $230,000 R -7.3% 10.9% 17.6% -55.6%
Merced $267,850 $257,000 $231,000 4.2% 16.0% 2.8% 31.0%
Placer $472,370 $446,000 $435,000 5.9% 8.6% -0.6% 0.0%
Sacramento $350,000 $350,000 $324,900 0.0% 7.7% 0.4% 11.4%
San Benito $545,000 $555,000 $517,500 -1.8% 5.3% -18.6% -7.9%
San Joaquin $365,000 $350,000 $314,730 4.3% 16.0% -4.8% 9.4%
Stanislaus $300,000 $295,000 $270,500 1.7% 10.9% -5.9% -4.5%
Tulare $225,000 $215,730 $216,500 4.3% 3.9% -0.4% 3.5%
Other Counties in California Feb-18 Jan-18 Feb-17 Price MTM% Chg Price YTY% Chg  Sales MTM% Chg  Sales YTY% Chg
Amador $318,500 $330,000 $265,000 -3.5% 20.2% 15.2% 65.2%
Butte $297,000 $314,750 $290,000 -5.6% 2.4% 0.0% -6.1%
Calaveras $311,500 $306,500 $294,500 1.6% 5.8% 7.5% 22.9%
Del Norte $216,500 $198,500 $265,000 9.1% -18.3% -10.0% 28.6%
El Dorado $468,000 $480,000 $419,500 -2.5% 11.6% -5.0% 24.3%
Humboldt $291,700 $300,000 $297,500 -2.8% -1.9% -7.0% 17.6%
Lake $234,500 $279,000 $230,000 -15.9% 2.0% -7.4% 8.7%
Lassen $280,000 $217,750 $171,000 28.6% 63.7% -35.0% 44.4%
Mariposa $357,000 $276,500 $335,000 29.1% 6.6% 37.5% -26.7%
Mendocino $420,000 $425,000 $381,500 -1.2% 10.1% -26.3% -9.7%
Mono $830,000 $480,000 $520,880 72.9% 59.3% 80.0% 50.0%
Nevada $400,000 $382,000 $390,000 4.7% 2.6% 33.3% 28.0%
Plumas $261,500 $265,950 $210,000 -1.7% 24.5% -30.0% 16.7%
Shasta $255,000 $249,000 $235,000 2.4% 8.5% -2.6% 7.4%
Siskiyou $200,000 $193,000 $240,000 3.6% -16.7% -17.5% 43.5%
Sutter $283,500 $284,200 $269,120 -0.2% 5.3% 8.3% 69.6%
Tehama $189,000 $227,500 $225,000 -16.9% -16.0% 3.1% 73.7%
Tuolumne $274,000 $265,000 $287,500 3.4% -4.7% -25.5% -14.6%
Yolo $397,500 $383,000 $372,000 3.8% 6.9% 6.2% -4.4%
Yuba $269,000 $265,360 $256,500 1.4% 4.9% 5.2% -11.6%
Note: The  MLS median price and sales data in the table below are generated from a survey of more than 90 associations of REALTORS® throughout the state, and represent statistics of existing single-family detached homes only.   sales data are not adjusted to account for seasonal factors that can influence home sales.  Movements in sales prices should not be interpreted as changes in the cost of a standard home.  Median prices can be influenced by changes in cost, as well as changes in the characteristics and the size of homes sold.  Due to the low sales volume in some areas, median price changes may exhibit unusual fluctuation.
Los Angeles Metropolitan Area is a 5- region that includes Los Angeles , Orange , Riverside , San Bernardino , and Ventura
S.F. Bay Area has been redefined to include the following counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma
Inland Empire includes Riverside  and San Bernardino
Note: “r” = revised
Scheduled Date for Press Release: 03/19/17

SHARE THE WARMTH…

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact Name: Diana Escobar

Contact email: PPM4rent@aol.com

 

Professional Property Management Seeks Coat Donations

 

Professional Property Management and One Warm Coat®,

spreading warmth…one coat at a time.

 

[El Sobrante, Calfornia, October, Day,2017 – Professional Property Management is hosting a coat drive to collect clean, gently worn, warm coats on October 16, 2017 thru January 31, 2018 between 9:00 AM and 5:00PM at 5054 El Portal Drive, Suite C, El Sobrante, CA . Area residents are invited to make a difference in our local community by donating to the coat drive and helping Professional Property Management reach their goal of collecting 500 coats and $1,000.00 dollars.

 

“We are so excited about our upcoming One Warm Coat drive and hope the community will support us.  There are nearly 50 million Americans currently living in poverty and struggling to provide a warm coat for themselves or their families.  One Warm Coat’s program helps us keep all of the coats we collect in this community, which will make a big difference for our neighbors who need a coat” said Coat Drive Ambassador and Professional Property Management’s Assistant Manager, Diana Escobar.

 

Customers who do not have a coat to donate can still get involved:

  • Professional Property Management will be asking for donations for One Warm Coat during check-out at the register.
  • Text “WARM” to 80100 to donate $10 to One Warm Coat
  • Visit onewarmcoat.org/donate

 

Each year, hundreds of thousands of gently worn coats are distributed across North America to children, women and men in need through One Warm Coat’s Coat Drive program. “We are so grateful for our partners like Professional Property Management!  It is because of our incredible volunteers that we have been around for 25 years, helping get coats to our neighbors who need them. Thanks to Professional Property Management’s efforts, many people in this community will have a much warmer winter”, commented Jennifer Stockard, President and Chief Executive Officer of One Warm Coat.

 

One Warm Coat is a national non-profit organization that works to provide a free, warm coat to any person in need and raises awareness of the vital need for warm coats.  One Warm Coat supports individuals, groups, companies and organizations across the country by providing the tools and resources needed to hold a successful coat drive.  Coats are distributed in the communities where they were collected, to any person in need, without charge, discrimination or obligation. Over the past 25 years, One Warm Coat has worked with its volunteers to give away nearly 5 million coats.

 

Professional Property Management is a full service Real Estate Brokerage specializing in Residential and Commercial Real Estate Leasing, Management and Sale throughout the East Bay Area. Professional Property Management is located at 5054 El Portal Drive, Suite C, El Sobrante, CA 94803 510-758-5636 CAL BRE 01902148

 

Apartment Owners Targeted for Huge Tax Increase!

Apartment Owners Targeted for Huge Tax Increase!

Provided by Apartment Owners Association, May 2017

That is, unless you and I raise our voices before they raise our taxes. As you may have heard, you are a part of that “1%” the politicians talk about. You see, they also look at your wealth even though they only talk about people with incomes of over $250,000 a year. As long-time real estate investors, you and I have much more wealth than most of those people who have yearly earnings of $250,000!

The difference? Most of them spend the $250,000, while you saved a part of whatever you earned. Apartment owners who have never earned over $50,000 a year from their jobs are worth millions and the politicians know it. They never talked about it because they wanted to suck in as many sheep as possible by getting voters to think bad things about high income people. They succeeded at getting the voters to think ill of everybody who was financially successful.

It’s now your turn! The politicians will be trying to turn voters against so-called “rich property owners” as they carry over this idea of creating ill will between the “haves” and the “have-nots”. In fact, you may have noticed that the news media is already dropping the 1% term and replacing it with “the wealthy”.

How Will They Do It?

The first thing that comes to mind is Proposition 13. The politicians have spent more money than they have forced us to pay and now they “need” more and more and more. So how can they get it? Simple – just change the rules that have protected property owners for so many years. Change Prop13 and they can raise property taxes on the “rich” commercial property owners. This is now possible because they have, for the first time, a 2/3 majority in both the Senate and the Assembly. The only way they can spend big is if they tax big and you are now their target!

Who Will Support The Politicians Doing This?

If they don’t touch homeowners, they will be able to pass their tax increases without much opposition. Only 1%-2% of the voters own commercial property. They can easily pit all the homeowners against the “rich commercial property owners” and keep the votes of the other 98%. It worked by tricking the voters in the last election to be in favor of taxing the “rich” who earned over $250,000. Many of these voters did not realize that they would probably be next. Just as these homeowners are now totally unaware that the politicians will eventually come after them too!

“Nothing But The Facts”

  1. Proposition 13 limits the taxation of all property.
  2. This can now be changed by our politicians with a 2/3 vote.
  3. The party in favor of raising taxes now has a 2/3 majority in both the Senate and the Assembly.
  4. They can collect millions more in taxes if they split the tax rolls on multi-family rental property and tax it at a higher rate than they tax homeowners’ properties.
  5. Homeowners will not complain any more than those who earned less than $250,000 complained about taxing the “rich”. You know, “As long as they raise taxes on the other guy, it’s OK!”
  6. Soooo, many legislators are now licking their chops and proposing that commercial property owners (this includes apartments) be taxed at a much higher rate than homeowners.
  7. Our elected officials are already planning to put it on the ballot!
  8. YOU are going to be “taken to the laundry” unless this whole idea can be stopped now.
  9. A campaign to protect 100% of Prop13 is urgently needed today!

It Costs Money!

All apartment owners and other commercial property owners throughout the state must join together immediately. Don’t wait before you join together and do your part. Please don’t leave it up to AOA or any other organization. YOU are AOA and you are the intended victim that they are going after and nobody else is more interested in keeping your property taxes from skyrocketing than YOU! All organizations in favor of property rights and/or lower taxes must join hands and ask their members to do two things right now.

Do It Now!

Number One: Write the Assemblyperson and the State Senator who represents you. You can get their name and address by going to http://senate.ca.gov/senators or http://assembly.ca.gov/assemblymembers. Explain to them how draconian a tax increase would be at this time and ask them to please lower the spending part of their budget. Tell them how you would personally be affected if that would help. Also tell them that the people voted Prop13 in and that it seems wrong for them to change it without a vote of the people. You might ask them to reduce spending instead of raising taxes.

Number Two: Donate, donate and donate some more! You can donate online at http://www.aoausa.com/govabuse/ or send a check payable to the AOA Political Action Committee and mail it to AOA PAC at 6445 Sepulveda Blvd., Suite 300, Van Nuys, CA 91411 TODAY! Why not do it now before you stop reading this article or you will just forget about it until you receive your property tax bill with a huge increase of thousands of dollars. I’m sure you don’t want to send thousands of more dollars to the politicians to waste in Sacramento. So instead, send a much smaller check today to the AOA PAC. (As you know, political action costs money and your tenants are certainly not going to join together with your side. If you want the job done, you are the one who is going to have to do it.)

Your dollars will be put together with other organizations as we unite in strength to stop this nonsense of raising your taxes.

P.S. Please visit http://www.aoausa.com/govabuse/ to donate at least $50 for every unit you own or control. More would be even better. Keep in mind that this project is just for you, and if lost, you will be paying many thousands of dollars more in taxes from now until forever! I know that you care, so let me hear from you today. Thank you for your support!!